Continuous Integration

My App Store release checklist

For the longest time it seemed that releasing an update to an iOS app was a random whack-a-mole process that I’d invariably get wrong in some way.  It was maddening, especially since iTunes Connect has only recently become a decent web application.  By switching to Jenkins for continuous integration of my iOS app builds I’ve greatly improved my process, but things didn’t really improve until I created a checklist for keeping track of my releases.

Since I’ve been asked many times about this very topic recently – both at work and on Twitter – I thought I’d write a post about how I bring some sanity to my release process so my app updates are timely and predictable.
Read More »My App Store release checklist

Building a static library with Jenkins

One of my pet peeves is Open Source iOS libraries distributed as just a collection of Objective-C classes, rather than being bundled as a static library. I know a lot of people prefer it that way, but from a maintainability standpoint it really doesn’t make much sense to me. So when I’m faced with another library I want to use that doesn’t have a static library readily available for it, I typically wrap it up in my own Xcode project, check it in to Github, and configure my Jenkins continuous integration build server to compile it for me.

I thought I’d walk you through the steps I go through to make this happen, so you can use this technique too.Read More »Building a static library with Jenkins

Building iOS apps for Over-The-Air AdHoc distribution

I’ve written about building iOS applications with Hudson Jenkins, but until recently there hasn’t been a convenient way of getting those applications to your testers. Of course the most important part of your build output will be the app bundle you send to Apple’s iTunes Connect web interface, but throughout your development cycle you’ll want to test your app.  Sure you could build and deploy a debug build straight to your own personal device, but you get the most benefit from having other people beta test your app.

With recent releases of Xcode and the iOS SDK, Apple improved their AdHoc distribution support with two main enhancements:

  1. Mobile provisioning files can now be embedded in the App’s IPA itself, meaning you don’t have to maintain and update separate .mobileprovision files separately;
  2. A specially-formated manifest Plist file can be created that, when linked to properly, allows test devices to install new versions of your AdHoc app without needing to plug into a computer to sync the app using iTunes.

These improvements are huge, but require some changes to your build scripts and your Continuous Integration environment.  I’d like to show you how to do this in your own installations, and show you some options for how to distribute your apps to your testers.

Read More »Building iOS apps for Over-The-Air AdHoc distribution

Continuous Deployment to CPAN

Recently I was working on a refactor of one of my CPAN modules which, among other things, involved changing its name from Test::A8N to the specific Test::Story.  Doing so made me think about the process I usually go through when I consider releasing a CPAN module.

First, let me explain something about myself: I don’t like tedious or repetitive tasks.  I hate having to do the same thing over and over again, partly because I don’t want to waste my time, but mostly because inevitably one of the following will happen:

  1. I’ll forget a crucial step, and will screw something up;
  2. I’ll forget how to do it, and in my efforts to re-learn it I’ll screw something up;
  3. I won’t care enough to go through the effort, so something will get screwed up.

I expect you’re noticing a trend here.  Really the only reason programmers come into this profession in the first place I suspect is because we’re just so bad at doing things the normal way, we have to automate everything we’ll either do poorly, lazily, or forget to do all together.

For those of us who are programmers, many times we’re so lazy that we won’t want to do the same thing within our programs more than once, so we abstract functionality into reusable modules.  By that token the Perl community must be some of the most inventively lazy group of people, because CPAN is full of useful tidbits like that.  Getting modules to CPAN requires a contributor to actually, you know, submit their project.  And this is, in itself, a somewhat manual process.

I do all of my development in a version control repository, and I write a decent amount of unit tests to prove my functionality works.  So once I come to the decision that a set of new features is worthy of a new release, this is the process I go through:

  1. Run “perl Makefile.PL && make && make test” to verify everything runs okay;
  2. Run “make dist” to create the distribution tarball;
  3. Noticing the version number is wrong, I go in and change it in the main Perl module;
  4. After running “make dist” again, I realize I forgot to change the README;
  5. Potentially after another “make dist“, I’ll remember I’m supposed to update the Changes file to indicate what I’ve added;
  6. It’s at this point I realize that I forgot to add new documentation to cover this new feature;
  7. I run “make test” again, this time with TEST_POD=1 set to ensure my documentation checks are run;
  8. I’ll then try to remember what the command is for uploading a new CPAN module, which involves searching on CPAN for something related to “Upload”;
  9. Finding “cpan-upload“, I’ll have to look at its documentation to figure out how to use it;
  10. I run “cpan-upload“, only to realize I forgot to set my PAUSE credentials in ~/.pause.

At this point, if I’m lucky, the upload will succeed.  This process isn’t meant to be a negative reflection on CPAN, but rather on my own forgetfulness and need to automate.

Read on to find out how I managed to automate this part of my life as well.

Read More »Continuous Deployment to CPAN