My App Store release checklist

For the longest time it seemed that releasing an update to an iOS app was a random whack-a-mole process that I’d invariably get wrong in some way.  It was maddening, especially since iTunes Connect has only recently become a decent web application.  By switching to Jenkins for continuous integration of my iOS app builds I’ve greatly improved my process, but things didn’t really improve until I created a checklist for keeping track of my releases.

Since I’ve been asked many times about this very topic recently – both at work and on Twitter – I thought I’d write a post about how I bring some sanity to my release process so my app updates are timely and predictable.
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Docset Viewer v1.2 and how to customize iCloud backups

I’ve recently released version 1.2 of Docset Viewer, which fixes a number of bugs people experienced with the previous version. If you had problems with the previous release, please give this one a try.

One of the improvements I’ve added is the ability to customize whether or not you would like to back up your Docsets (which can get quite large) into iCloud. To keep with the instructional nature of this site, I’ll show you how you can do that in your own apps.
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Smarter and More Reusable Core Data

Like most developers, I look to Apple’s default application templates to get up-to-speed on what would appear as being the Right Way™ of developing apps on iOS. In practice however what you need to realize is Apple’s templates are meant to be the easiest introduction to a set of tools that can be fairly complicated for beginners to understand.  Core Data is one of those areas. The problem is when you try to grow your application you’ve built on top of Apple’s sample template. You’ll experience some annoying growing pains, and will need to give your code a thorough washing and a fresh coat of wax to be able to mature your application.

In my code I’ve learned to share and reuse my classes with other applications I’m writing by encapsulating a lot of the boilerplate into reusable classes, as well as wrapping my whole Core Data model in a reusable static library. This wasn’t the most intuitive thing to get right, but now that it’s done it was really worth the effort. Let me show you how it’s done.

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